Suburbanization of the City: An examination of the built environment characteristics and social life of German Village, a historic urban neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio
The approach advances a developing theory of suburban form and culture that looks past traditional definitions of a suburb to uncover a more nuanced understanding of both the land use and lifestyle implications of suburbanization. Can the dramatic land use change in German Village since the 1960s be attributed to the suburbanization of the city?

Abstract
Demographic shifts are leading people back to the historic urban cores of cities nationwide. The central city neighborhood of German Village in Columbus, Ohio has experienced extraordinary investment and today has many single-family homes on the market for over $1 million. While many urban neighborhoods build vertically when residential demand increases, the options for increased housing stock in German Village are essentially non-existent due to its strict regulation as a historic district. This circumstance of high demand and extremely low supply has inflated home values in this small neighborhood and has contributed to change in the built environment within the confines of a historic preservation regulatory framework. As a result, the neighborhood currently includes more suburban characteristics than many people recognize.

This research explores the impacts of increased demand for living space on the built environment and investigates how the culture and space of German Village are inter-related. The approach advances a developing theory of suburban form and culture that looks past traditional definitions of a suburb to uncover a more nuanced understanding of both the land use and lifestyle implications of suburbanization. Can the dramatic land use change in German Village since the 1960s be attributed to the suburbanization of the city?